realistic fiction · YA Contemporary · Young Adult

10 Things I Can See From Here by Carrie Mac

31019571ISBN: 9781524719265

Title: 10 Things I Can See From Here

Author: Carrie Mac

Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers

Publishing Date: February 28th 2017

Format: ARC

Number of Pages: 312

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction

afire-pages-summaryPerfect for fans of Finding Audrey and Everything, Everything, this is the poignant and uplifting story of Maeve, who is dealing with anxiety while falling in love with a girl who is not afraid of anything.


Think positive.
Don’t worry; be happy.
Keep calm and carry on.

Maeve has heard it all before. She’s been struggling with severe anxiety for a long time, and as much as she wishes it was something she could just talk herself out of, it’s not. She constantly imagines the worst, composes obituaries in her head, and is always ready for things to fall apart. To add to her troubles, her mom—the only one who really gets what Maeve goes through—is leaving for six months, so Maeve will be sent to live with her dad in Vancouver.

Vancouver brings a slew of new worries, but Maeve finds brief moments of calm (as well as even more worries) with Salix, a local girl who doesn’t seem to worry about anything. Between her dad’s wavering sobriety, her very pregnant stepmom insisting on a home birth, and her bumbling courtship with Salix, this summer brings more catastrophes than even Maeve could have foreseen. Will she be able to navigate through all the chaos to be there for the people she loves? afire-pages-book-reviews

10 things I can say about 10 Things I Can See From Here by Carrie Mac:

  1. It has a very great representation. The female main character Maeve suffers from anxiety and she is gay. GUYS, I JUST WANT TO SAY THAT

 

THIS.IS.WHAT.ANXIETY.IS

THIS.IS.WHAT.ANXIETY.DO

THIS.IS.HOW.YOU.REPRESENT.PEOPLE.WITH.ANXIETY

As a teenager who knows what anxiety really is firsthand, I feel so glad to be represented in a very good way. In a perfect way. Right from the beginning of the book, I already saw how the author was doing things right. How Miss Carrie Mac was representing me – or us teenagers who are suffering from anxiety didorder. I honestly don’t know how to speak about the gay representation because I do not know what it is to be gay. So as a reader, I took what I’ve read as learning. I’ve been reading books with girl to girl relationships lately and if there’s one things I’ve learned about them from reading books that represents them just like 10 Things I Can See From Here is that they’re normal. Yep, just normal. Them being attracted to both sexes or with the same sex doesn’t mean that they are less human than we who are “straight”.

And really, we need more and more books like this that represents them because this will help people understand them. This will make people see that they’re just like all of us. That they have rights, they’re people, they have feelings, and they have to be loved. And that we’re all just the same. They’re same with us. There’s nothing abnormal with being gay. We all need to keep that in mind.

 

  1. The story’s focuses were topics that are timely and need to be talked about in YA. It focuses on three (3) things: Anxiety, family issues and f to f relationship.

 

10 Things I Can See From Here tackles topics that most teenagers nowadays can easily relate to. First is anxiety, and we all know – and you MUST know if you haven’t yet – that some or maybe most teenagers nowadays is suffering from anxiety. This book has such a very good representation that has an important message not just for them but also for people who surround them and how people – especially their families – should help and support them. Second is the family issues, Maeve’s family clearly isn’t perfect. She has broken family but there are still people in her life who truly loves her. This topic is important because it really happens. It does happen. Some teenagers have broken families and we need to talk about it. How it affects the children in that broken family, how should they handle it and how people around them should help them handle it. And lastly is the f to f relationship. Maeve is gay. There are gay teens out there who are scared of being out. There are teens out there who are still figuring it out. And there straight people out there who cannot accept people of the lgbtq community. We need more lgbtq rep and we need more books like this to use as a tool to help people accept and understand them.

We need to talk about all of these. And 10 Things I Can See From Here just chose the right topics.

  1. Salix – Maeve’s love interest – is sexy, confident and almost everything nice. This character had just been the light to Maeve’s life. What happened in this book was not the “love-will-cure-your-mental-illness” thing – though I’m not saying that anxiety is a mental illness, it’s the sense I am talking about. But Salix came to Maeve’s life for a reason. It was to be her light, to teach her, to make advice and be there while Maeve is managing her life and problems on her own. That’s a good way on doing it. That’s a good way on putting a love interest on a characters’ life who’s having mental disorder. And even if she came or not on Maeve’s life, Salix’s character alone was really the kind that was very hard not to like and admire. That’s why I totally love Salix.

 

  1. Maeve and Salix’ relationship started the way I do not like how some love stories start. Salix and Maeve’s relationship started way too fast. That was quite unbelievable. They just saw each other for the first time and boom! That’s it. They were already interested with each other. That is what I really do not – and never will like – to see on love stories. Maybe it does happen. But I personally cannot stand reading it because I just cannot believe it.
  1. Maeve and Salix’ relationship is healthy. This is what I’d love to always see in YA. Even though Maeve and Salix’s relationship started too fast, I like where their relationship lead them. This is what we should always see in YA. Not a toxic relationship, but a healthy and strong one. They may have started way too fast, but what they’ve become while they’re together is just really a lovely and inspiring thing. That’s the kind that will personally make you feel jealous and make you wish you have that kind of person in your own life too. 10 Things I Can See From Here inspires me and makes me believe in love again.
  1. Claire – Maeve’s stepmother – is love. We all know that evil stepmothers are way too common than “fairy stepmothers.” And Claire was one of them. Claire portrays such a very empowering and inspiring character. I love how she handles things in their family. I love the kindness, the understanding, the strength and the independence she posses.

 

The characters you need to watch out for in 10 Thinsg I Can See From Here was not just the main character but ALL the characters. They all have different things or messages to say.

 

  1. Sexism was tackled. Though not on the highlight, this book tackled sexism and showed how things will be different for you depending on what gender you have. On how you can get out of things easily just because of your gender. And how things like that really SHOULD NOT happen.

 

  1. Emotions were lacking. This is why I just like this book and not love it. I felt bored while reading it. Sometimes I felt like it was dragging. It’s still good but I wanted and needed more. I enjoyed this but I am not really a fan. It was good, yes, but the ride felt like I was just riding a bus or train and not a frigging roller coaster.

 

  1. The end was satisfying. “Ooohh, that end was wild.” This is what I immediately thought after reading the end. It was ended in a way that really got my approval. It was just satisfying and enough.

 

  1. It has a very important and helpful message to everyone but more especially, to teens who are suffering from anxiety. It teaches us to be worried, to be afraid, to be nervous but do things anyway. It teaches us to carry on. If you cannot stop worrying, then keep worrying and then find a way to live with it. Anxiety isn’t just a simple thing that will disappear once you wanted it to. It’s a severe condition that can lead to so many bad things. So if you cannot stop it then why not learn to live with it instead of doing harmful things just because you feel like dying whenever anxiety attacks you? Anxiety is not an easy thing to handle but you need to learn to still do things anyway. You need to prevent it from stopping you. You have to live.

afire-pages-rating

3-flowers

afire-pages-about-the-author

360816.jpgI live with my partner and two children in East Van, overlooking the shipyards and with a great view of the crows flying home to roost.

Or:

When Carrie Mac was born, her right eye gawked off in one direction while her left eye looked the other way. Well meaning adults thought she was a changeling and so they wrapped her up and put her on the porch for the fairies to take back, please and thank you. It was snowing. It was dark. No fairies came. The same well meaning adults decided she’d catch her death out there. So they brought her in and kept her after all.

She’s read millions of books, and has sat happily at the feat of a legion of storytellers. She is equally fascinated by disaster and grace. car wrecks, hurricanes, plagues, and genocides on the one hand, small and stunning everyday miracles on the other. She sometimes wishes she were a pirate. She’d often wished she’d run away and joined the circus when she had the chance. She spends a great deal of time in the company of her imagination, and when she isn’t, she’s wide eyed and awed by this planet and the people running amok all over it.

Find her on:

WebsiteTwitter

afire-pages-purchase-here

Barnes & Noble | Amazon

*A huge thanks to the Penguin Random House International for providing me an ARC in exchange of an honest book review. The ARC received by any means didn’t affect nor influence my review.

sign

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s